The Cutthroat Diaries

Kim Barnes, author and angler, channeling a little Izaak Walton and dreaming of tight lines over white pages, blue waters.

Team Names

Let’s just forget naming our sports teams after groups of people (although I kind of like the Battling Bishops), animals (Anteaters? Really?), vegetables (Go, Artichokes? Geez, Scotsdale!), and fantasies (Blue Dragons, maybe, but Centaurs? Just sayin’). How about after bands? The Steely Dans might draw a more literary crowd (and some snickers from those who have read Naked Lunch). I think the Dead Kennedys would be a fabulous choice for an East Coast team. The Velvet Underground has a nicely menacing tone. The Decemberists might bring an end to your year-long winning streak. And who wouldn’t follow a sports team named the Nirvanas? The Blacks are good, but the White Stripes might be better.

ambwrelationships:

jtotheizzoe:

boop.
This man.

love this show

Phun with physics—and sexier than Miley’s Wrecking Ball.

ambwrelationships:

jtotheizzoe:

boop.

This man.

love this show

Phun with physics—and sexier than Miley’s Wrecking Ball.

(via ophelia-pain)

explore-blog:

Kurt Vonnegut's advice to the young on kindness, computers, community, and the power of great teachers


Gratitude is what I feel…

“I must have flowers, always, and always.”

—   Claude Monet (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: morigrrl, via thatkindofwoman)

“We waste so many days waiting for weekend. So many nights wanting morning. Our lust for future comfort is the biggest thief of life.”

—   unknown (via thatkindofwoman)

If not now, when?

(Source: joshuaglenn, via thatkindofwoman)

humansofnewyork:

"Everything is up in the air right now. My dog just died. My car just got hit. And I might get evicted. All I’ve got is my health."

Chin up!

humansofnewyork:

"Everything is up in the air right now. My dog just died. My car just got hit. And I might get evicted. All I’ve got is my health."

Chin up!

nprbooks:

Today on Cool Stuff We Get In The Mail

In Once Upon a Playground, Brenda Biondo photographs vintage playground equipment and pairs them with their original catalog listings.

The result is kind of creepy — I would not want to meet any of these jungle gyms alone in a dark alley.

That said, look at that SPACESHIP PLAYGROUND.

-Nicole

Hey, don’t be harshing on metal merry-go-rounds. Those things were so much fun I’m surprised they were EVER allowed.

— Petra

Throwback…and many memories of playground injuries…

(via politicsprose)

skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.

I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):

*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.

The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:

Living textiles…

(via politicsprose)

“Neither a man nor a crowd nor a nation can be trusted to act humanely or to think sanely under the influence of a great fear.”

uidahodigital:

A student leads a draft horse away from a barn on the University of Idaho campus, 1936.
From the University of Idaho Campus Photograph Collection

uidahodigital:

A student leads a draft horse away from a barn on the University of Idaho campus, 1936.

From the University of Idaho Campus Photograph Collection

nprfreshair:

Dr. Martin Blaser is an expert on the human microbiome, which is the collection of bacteria, viruses, fungi and other microbes that live in and on the body. In fact, about 70 to 90 percent of all the cells in the human body aren’t human at all — they’re micro-organisms. 
Blaser is the author of Missing Microbes, and speculates that overuse of antibiotics causes food allergies, asthma, and intestinal disorders.
If antibiotics are wiping out these micro-organisms, then probiotics are putting some of them back in. 
Here’s what Dr. Blaser says about the use of probiotics: 

"There are many different probiotics. If you go to the grocery store, the health food store, the drugstore, there are shelves and shelves full of probiotics [with] different names, different compositions. I think I can say three things: The first is that they’re almost completely unregulated; second is that they seem to be generally safe; and third is that they’re mostly untested about the important reasons that people even want to take probiotics because they don’t feel well or they have particular symptoms …
Right now, it’s the Wild West. I’m actually a big believer in probiotics; I think that’s going to be part of the future of medicine, that we’re going to understand the science of the microbiome well enough so that we can look at a sample from a child and say this child is lacking such-and-such an organism and now we’re going to take it off the shelf and we’re going to give it back to that child … Just as today the kids are lining up for the vaccines, in the future, maybe the kids are going to be drinking certain organisms so that we can replace the ones that they’ve lost.”

nprfreshair:

Dr. Martin Blaser is an expert on the human microbiome, which is the collection of bacteria, viruses, fungi and other microbes that live in and on the body. In fact, about 70 to 90 percent of all the cells in the human body aren’t human at all — they’re micro-organisms. 

Blaser is the author of Missing Microbes, and speculates that overuse of antibiotics causes food allergies, asthma, and intestinal disorders.

If antibiotics are wiping out these micro-organisms, then probiotics are putting some of them back in. 

Here’s what Dr. Blaser says about the use of probiotics: 

"There are many different probiotics. If you go to the grocery store, the health food store, the drugstore, there are shelves and shelves full of probiotics [with] different names, different compositions. I think I can say three things: The first is that they’re almost completely unregulated; second is that they seem to be generally safe; and third is that they’re mostly untested about the important reasons that people even want to take probiotics because they don’t feel well or they have particular symptoms …

Right now, it’s the Wild West. I’m actually a big believer in probiotics; I think that’s going to be part of the future of medicine, that we’re going to understand the science of the microbiome well enough so that we can look at a sample from a child and say this child is lacking such-and-such an organism and now we’re going to take it off the shelf and we’re going to give it back to that child … Just as today the kids are lining up for the vaccines, in the future, maybe the kids are going to be drinking certain organisms so that we can replace the ones that they’ve lost.”

humansofnewyork:

These two were acting like complete teenagers. When I walked up, she was nuzzling her head against his shoulder. She giggled the entire time I talked with them, while he kept a big goofy grin on his face. And whenever I asked about their relationship, she clutched his arm, looked at him just like this, giggled, then said: “We’re not telling!”

humansofnewyork:

These two were acting like complete teenagers. When I walked up, she was nuzzling her head against his shoulder. She giggled the entire time I talked with them, while he kept a big goofy grin on his face. And whenever I asked about their relationship, she clutched his arm, looked at him just like this, giggled, then said: “We’re not telling!”

flavorpill:

We present to you a guide to appreciating one of America’s best (and sometimes infuriatingly outdated) authors
The Skeptic’s Guide to John Updike

flavorpill:

We present to you a guide to appreciating one of America’s best (and sometimes infuriatingly outdated) authors

The Skeptic’s Guide to John Updike

newyorker:

Every day on our home page, we share a cartoon based on the day’s events. Today’s cartoon by Mick Stevens: http://nyr.kr/1eAHYPt

newyorker:

Every day on our home page, we share a cartoon based on the day’s events. Today’s cartoon by Mick Stevens: http://nyr.kr/1eAHYPt

(Source: newyorker.com)

flavorpill:

Awesome japanese farmer + adorable baby pigs = squee factor of 1,000

Beautiful Photos of a Farmer and His Pigs