The Cutthroat Diaries

Kim Barnes, author and angler, channeling a little Izaak Walton and dreaming of tight lines over white pages, blue waters.

edwardian-time-machine:

Woman by pond, ca. 1906-12. Autochrome (early color photograph) by the Lumiere brothers.
Source

edwardian-time-machine:

Woman by pond, ca. 1906-12. Autochrome (early color photograph) by the Lumiere brothers.

Source

(via ophelia-pain)

ilovereadingandwriting:

bookstore (via Pin by Lorena Garcia on Comedy | Pinterest)
outofprintclothing:

Remembering William S. Burroughs, who died on this day, August 2, in 1997.

outofprintclothing:

Remembering William S. Burroughs, who died on this day, August 2, in 1997.

humansofnewyork:

“How’d you meet?”“We were both looking at the same sculpture.”

humansofnewyork:

“How’d you meet?”
“We were both looking at the same sculpture.”

Literary flasks by Drinking Buddy.

Oscar Wilde, William Shakespeare and Sherlock Holmes.

You can follow hollowbookco on Tumblr for more amazing flasks and their great hollow books.

(Source: bookporn)

“Diary novels are a product of the Victorian era, with their own fully stocked canon and historically specific conventions; it’s an under-attended but significant genre. Most early diary novels were written by clergy who didn’t actually read girls’ diaries: the diary novel developed under a tradition of older, usually religious people condemning diaries while also taking advantage of their cultural cachet. The irony of more contemporary diary novels like Go Ask Alice is this: ostensibly progressive, fun-loving diary novels feature a girl’s voice but are often bent on silencing women or at least quelling experimentation…”

humansofnewyork:

“I was a young, lily-white liberal who majored in social work. I imagined myself as a Dorothea Dix type figure, who was going to save the world. Then I graduated and learned about bureaucracy. So I lowered my goals, and just tried to help a couple of people every day.”

humansofnewyork:

“I was a young, lily-white liberal who majored in social work. I imagined myself as a Dorothea Dix type figure, who was going to save the world. Then I graduated and learned about bureaucracy. So I lowered my goals, and just tried to help a couple of people every day.”

nypl:

This note was found on the back of a letter from birthday boy Herman Melville to Nathaniel Hawthorne. It reads: “If you find any sand in this letter, regard it as so many sands of my life, which run out as I was writing it.” You can see the full letter here,  complete with writing advice and other gems like “…I shall lay eyes on you one of these days however. Keep some Champagne or Gin for me.” Happy Birthday Herman Melville!

nypl:

This note was found on the back of a letter from birthday boy Herman Melville to Nathaniel Hawthorne. It reads: “If you find any sand in this letter, regard it as so many sands of my life, which run out as I was writing it.” You can see the full letter here,  complete with writing advice and other gems like “…I shall lay eyes on you one of these days however. Keep some Champagne or Gin for me.” Happy Birthday Herman Melville!

flavorpill:

Everything Book Lovers Need to Know About Amazon vs. Hachette

vintagebooksdesign:

SHAKESPEARE FOR GROWN-UPS - E. Foley and B. Coates

With lively in-depth chapters on all his key works, Shakespeare for Grown-ups is the only guide to the Scribe you’ll ever need. Covering everything from the historical context of his writing and personal life to his most famous speeches, quotations, phrases and words that have entered general usage today.

We wanted to give the cover a bold, graphic approach, with a recognisable image and a modern twist. The endpapers incorporate some of the Shakespearian phrases we still use today.

And ‘as luck would have it’ you can download the endpapers to print out and use as a poster.

Published by Square Peg on the 4th September

(via politicsprose)

flavorpill:

Flavorwire’s Guide to Indie Flicks to See in August 

beholdthebond:

jubilantics:

Books won’t stay banned. They won’t burn. Ideas won’t go to jail. In the long run of history, the censor and the inquisitor have always lost. The only sure weapon against bad ideas is better ideas. — Alfred Whitney Griswald

Banned Books Mugshots: Alaska Young (Looking for Alaska), Janie Crawford (Their Eyes Were Watching God), Holden Caulfield (The Catcher in the Rye), Harry Potter (Harry Potter), and Hester Prynne (The Scarlet Letter).

THIS IS MY FAVORITE THING

(via politicsprose)

humansofnewyork:

“I was extremely shy when I was younger. I wasn’t asked to the prom or anything. Life didn’t really even start for me until I turned fifty. But let’s just say I got plenty of experience after that!”

humansofnewyork:

“I was extremely shy when I was younger. I wasn’t asked to the prom or anything. Life didn’t really even start for me until I turned fifty. But let’s just say I got plenty of experience after that!”

humansofnewyork:

“I didn’t get married until I was 55. But boy was it worth the wait. He looked just like Peter O’Toole!”

humansofnewyork:

“I didn’t get married until I was 55. But boy was it worth the wait. He looked just like Peter O’Toole!”

via atlasobscura:

Book Towns: Where Reading is the Reason to Live

Some small towns in the rural reaches that lost their former industries have reimagined themselves as "book towns." By filling empty storefronts with used and antiquarian bookshops, and hosting literary festivals, the goal is to attract new visitors in the form of bibliophiles. 

The book towns are officially united through the International Organisation of Book Towns. The movement started in 1961 with Richard Booth in Hay-on-Wye in Wales, and now includes towns across Europe and in Malaysia, Korea, and Australia. However, the drive for a sustainable tourism development program in these rural areas has hit some hurdles in recent years with the consolidation of the used book trade online and rise of the e-book. As Adrian Turpin, director of the literary festival in Wigtown, Scotland’s book town, told the BBC in 2012:

"There was a time when second-hand book sellers in book towns were first of all selling books and secondly selling the experience of browsing. Now it is almost the other way around."

Despite these recent changes in the literary landscape, the book towns thrive on.

For five of our favorites, keep reading on Atlas Obscura… 

(via bookporn)